Software, automation and savings

Posted by on set 26, 2011 in ITMA | 0 comments

Savings in energy, water and waste – this is clearly the key theme of ITMA 2011 here in Barcelona. The BLUecoMPETENCE initiative by the textile machinery branch of Germany’s VDMA, for example, is all about ecological design and energy efficiency, and one company responding to it in a big way is Trützschler.
The new Trützschler Nonwovens Streamliner drum dryer, for example, achieves much higher specific evaporation capacities than has previously been possible.
“The Streamliner’s optimised airflow with minimal pressure loss is combined with an optimised fresh air based on temperature-dependent density changes,” explains marketing manager Eric Schinnerling. “This and the advanced heating system ensure an optimised flow technology, while energy efficiency can be further increased by external air treatment and heat exchange. On today’s advanced standard-width spunlacing lines for nonwovens such as wipes, the company has calculated that as a result of the 30% less energy that this dryer makes possible, average savings of €410,000 a year can be achieved.
In drylaid nonwovens production meanwhile, the crosslapper stage of a line has turned into something of a bottleneck due to the high speeds of cards at one end and the bonding and winding systems at the other. Trützschler has aimed to remedy this with the development of its EKLB439 crosslapper. A number of new patents have been secured on its design, based on both new web guidance elements and the mastery of the dynamic factors influencing both process and machine.
Not so long ago, virtually every machinery development at an ITMA was about running speeds. Now it’s all about manufacturing efficiency. Nothing’s changed that much really, since faster speeds obviously mean greater productivity within the same working shift or timeframe.
This is all well and good when considering 24/7 commodity production, but here in Europe things no longer work that way.
Somewhere between the race for ever-higher machine speeds and today’s emphasis on sustainability, the goal-posts changed.
Short lots, ‘just in time’ and niche production, processing flexibility and instant response have become the keys to success for the majority of European manufacturers.
Efficient drives to minimise the number of mechanical parts and automation and software tools, continue to allow tremendous gains to be made in this respect.
A neat example of software progress is the new Plant Explorer app specially made for Android tablets and smartphones by the UK’s Adaptive Control.
“To our knowledge, this is a breakthrough for textile-manufacturing plants, giving the smartphones that people are already carrying in their pockets,” says managing director Richard Armitage. “It allows mill managers to browse real-time production data, diagnose delays and get the reports they need without even having to find a PC. The screens are closely modelled on our industry-leading Plant Explorer software for PCs, which will be familiar to all our software users around the world.”
“People are really going for the slick response of the new app, and they just need to tune in to their plant’s local Wi-Fi network to get online,” adds US sales director Tony Webber. “This can even be done while on the road if the plant has a suitable VPN access point.”
The app can be downloaded free from the Android marketplace and runs on any Android smartphone or tablet, version 1.5 or later.
An example of advanced automation, meanwhile, can be found at the tiny stand of CU4motion in Hall 2 – I’ll write more about this new company tomorrow.
In opening the IFAI’s Advanced Textiles Europe 2011 conference here at ITMA this afternoon, Greggory D. Crouch, the US Consul General for Barcelona, revealed an interesting fact – only 1% of all companies manufacturing in the USA export anything at all.
Of that 1%, almost 60% of companies only export to one other country. As far as textiles are concerned, Canada, Mexico and Honduras are the leading export destinations for US goods.
This may be about to change, however, following President Obama’s 2010 National Export Initiative (NEI) which is seeking to double the amount of US goods sold to other countries in the next five years – the first such presidentially-led drive.

Savings in energy, water and waste – this is clearly the key theme of ITMA 2011 here in Barcelona. The BLUecoMPETENCE initiative by the textile machinery branch of Germany’s VDMA, for example, is all about ecological design and energy efficiency, and one company responding to it in a big way is Trützschler.The new Trützschler Nonwovens Streamliner drum dryer, for example, achieves much higher specific evaporation capacities than has previously been possible.

“The Streamliner’s optimised airflow with minimal pressure loss is combined with an optimised fresh air based on temperature-dependent density changes,” explains marketing manager Eric Schinnerling. “This and the advanced heating system ensure an optimised flow technology, while energy efficiency can be further increased by external air treatment and heat exchange. On today’s advanced standard-width spunlacing lines for nonwovens such as wipes, the company has calculated that as a result of the 30% less energy that this dryer makes possible, average savings of €410,000 a year can be achieved.In drylaid nonwovens production meanwhile, the crosslapper stage of a line has turned into something of a bottleneck due to the high speeds of cards at one end and the bonding and winding systems at the other. Trützschler has aimed to remedy this with the development of its EKLB439 crosslapper. A number of new patents have been secured on its design, based on both new web guidance elements and the mastery of the dynamic factors influencing both process and machine.
Not so long ago, virtually every machinery development at an ITMA was about running speeds. Now it’s all about manufacturing efficiency. Nothing’s changed that much really, since faster speeds obviously mean greater productivity within the same working shift or timeframe.

This is all well and good when considering 24/7 commodity production, but here in Europe things no longer work that way.
Somewhere between the race for ever-higher machine speeds and today’s emphasis on sustainability, the goal-posts changed.
Short lots, ‘just in time’ and niche production, processing flexibility and instant response have become the keys to success for the majority of European manufacturers.
Efficient drives to minimise the number of mechanical parts and automation and software tools, continue to allow tremendous gains to be made in this respect.
A neat example of software progress is the new Plant Explorer app specially made for Android tablets and smartphones by the UK’s Adaptive Control.
“To our knowledge, this is a breakthrough for textile-manufacturing plants, giving the smartphones that people are already carrying in their pockets,” says managing director Richard Armitage. “It allows mill managers to browse real-time production data, diagnose delays and get the reports they need without even having to find a PC. The screens are closely modelled on our industry-leading Plant Explorer software for PCs, which will be familiar to all our software users around the world.”

“People are really going for the slick response of the new app, and they just need to tune in to their plant’s local Wi-Fi network to get online,” adds US sales director Tony Webber. “This can even be done while on the road if the plant has a suitable VPN access point.”
The app can be downloaded free from the Android marketplace and runs on any Android smartphone or tablet, version 1.5 or later.
An example of advanced automation, meanwhile, can be found at the tiny stand of CU4motion in Hall 2 – I’ll write more about this new company tomorrow.
In opening the IFAI’s Advanced Textiles Europe 2011 conference here at ITMA this afternoon, Greggory D. Crouch, the US Consul General for Barcelona, revealed an interesting fact – only 1% of all companies manufacturing in the USA export anything at all.

Of that 1%, almost 60% of companies only export to one other country. As far as textiles are concerned, Canada, Mexico and Honduras are the leading export destinations for US goods.
This may be about to change, however, following President Obama’s 2010 National Export Initiative (NEI) which is seeking to double the amount of US goods sold to other countries in the next five years – the first such presidentially-led drive.

source: ITMA

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